Author Topic: Zen  (Read 12471 times)

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TEEEPO

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Re: Zen
« Reply #180 on: November 05, 2018, 06:34:53 PM »
you have no idea how much play my hair has gotten me :lol

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #181 on: November 05, 2018, 06:35:39 PM »
you have no idea how much play my hair has gotten me :lol

:yuck

(jk I am similarly hairy lol)

CatsCatsCats

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Re: Zen
« Reply #182 on: November 05, 2018, 06:36:05 PM »
Audiophiles are angry, why are you guys angry?

TEEEPO

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Re: Zen
« Reply #183 on: November 05, 2018, 06:36:06 PM »
naw can't play your way of this one

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #184 on: November 05, 2018, 06:39:20 PM »
naw can't play your way of this one

Out of what?

Out of you wrongly thinking that Sonos re-compresses audio and that it isn't capable of streaming to real speakers? 

1) It doesn't, it uses wi-fi.. so it's up to the service what quality to stream, in the case of Tidal that's FLAC
2) There are multiple Sonos products that are designed for connecting to wired speakers / amps of your choice

And hell, for the bedroom their own wireless speakers aren't bad (and again, they aren't typical "wireless speakers" they are wi-fi recievers w/ speakers on them)

Say more wrong things, and go shave.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2018, 06:44:03 PM by riotous »

CatsCatsCats

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Re: Zen
« Reply #185 on: November 05, 2018, 06:42:17 PM »
You guys, this isn’t very zen  :doge

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #186 on: November 05, 2018, 06:47:36 PM »
Being Zen is overrated.

CatsCatsCats

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Re: Zen
« Reply #187 on: November 05, 2018, 06:48:56 PM »
Kinda like your sonos set up, amirite?

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #188 on: November 05, 2018, 06:49:43 PM »
 :jeanluc

TEEEPO

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Re: Zen
« Reply #189 on: November 05, 2018, 06:52:46 PM »
naw can't play your way of this one

Out of what?

Out of you wrongly thinking that Sonos re-compresses audio and that it isn't capable of streaming to real speakers? 

1) It doesn't, it uses wi-fi.. so it's up to the service what quality to stream, in the case of Tidal that's FLAC
2) There are multiple Sonos products that are designed for connecting to wired speakers / amps of your choice

And hell, for the bedroom their own wireless speakers aren't bad (and again, they aren't typical "wireless speakers" they are wi-fi recievers w/ speakers on them)

Say more wrong things, and go shave.

:huh

you're frail af

Tasty

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Re: Zen
« Reply #190 on: November 05, 2018, 06:54:36 PM »
Kinda like your sonos set up, amirite?

A kingdom without its ruler is swift to crumble.
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riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #191 on: November 05, 2018, 06:55:14 PM »
Nobody insults my SONOS

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #192 on: November 05, 2018, 06:57:57 PM »
Frailty is a pretty awesome movie though need to watch that one again.

toku

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Re: Zen
« Reply #193 on: November 05, 2018, 09:58:04 PM »

Tasty

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Re: Zen
« Reply #194 on: November 05, 2018, 10:57:37 PM »
spoiler (click to show/hide)
[close]
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TVC15

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Re: Zen
« Reply #195 on: November 05, 2018, 11:24:23 PM »
serge

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #196 on: November 05, 2018, 11:37:19 PM »
That is a sexy cat.

naff

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Re: Zen
« Reply #197 on: November 06, 2018, 02:18:44 AM »
Your Sonos Connect tops out at 16/44.1. And to be fair the hifi tidal touts is 16/44.1. Saying CD quality is lossless will trigger audiophiles like teeepo tho it seems. FLAC is a "lossless" format, doesn't mean the audio contained isn't lossy. Also, who knows what the original recording rates were.

I think the benefits of high res audio beyond CD quality sampling rate and frequency for playback are pretty dubious tho and Sonos Connect seems pretty convenient and dece. I like their interface. HRA is going from one extreme (mp3) to another (24/192). I'm good w the middle ground CD quality, streamable audio and focusing on observable wavelengths. I would bet my life's worth no-one here could tell you the difference between something recorded at 24/48 and 24/192 in a double blind test consistently. 192khz is marketing shite.
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TEEEPO

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Re: Zen
« Reply #198 on: November 06, 2018, 03:09:44 AM »
it's more the way riotus carries himself than being triggered over audiophile shit but to elaborate: it's the fact that he's touting loseless audio over the sonos ecosystem when the sonos drivers are 3.5m in diameter. incidentally, i had owned a sonos play:1 and do believe it to be a benchmark speaker for its size and wireless setup but it has a flat frequency response from low to hi which doesn't really have the dynamic range to bring to life any audio recording with any hint of a soundstage. though the flat curve is actually a good thing for multimedia speakers (can drive anything) and its frequency response is a technological/engineering marvel for a speakers its size. however, i believe sonos themselves said higher bitrates don't benefit their speakers in response to whether a dac would improve the sound, if i remember correctly. though a dac would add "colour" to the sound, and did.

but either way, fuck that racist cunt.

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #199 on: November 06, 2018, 10:45:40 AM »
Dude.. it was a joke.. (the "poor" comment and any other time I say anything remotely like that)  I didn't say a word about Tidal, I posted a screenshot and someonew talked shit.. so I joked about the lossless and how it's not for poor people.    You then called me an idiot and were blatantly wrong about the facts you were stating..

Because....how many times do I have to tell you I have my Sonos connected to my main home theater you dolt?  You also clearly were mistaken on how Sonos works, not realizing it's just wi-fi and a DAC... so it's not BT wireless or any other re-compression.  Because otherwise why would you keep bringing up wireless and lossless?

In other rooms I have Play 3's and Play 5's.. so.. again.. enjoy your Play:1 and leave me alone.  Racist?  WTF?

Like fuck I know it's embaressing to be wrong and call someone else a moron at the same time but give it a rest you dumb  fuck.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2018, 10:52:06 AM by riotous »

TEEEPO

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Re: Zen
« Reply #200 on: November 06, 2018, 10:56:47 AM »
think of the connotation of telling a brown man to go shave...

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #201 on: November 06, 2018, 10:58:09 AM »
Had no clue you were a "brown man".

TEEEPO

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Re: Zen
« Reply #202 on: November 06, 2018, 10:59:24 AM »
you're clueless on a lot of things, comprehension as well

Tasty

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Re: Zen
« Reply #203 on: November 06, 2018, 11:00:41 AM »
Yeah lol what even was that insult
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riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #204 on: November 06, 2018, 11:02:02 AM »
It was a joke, I had minutes earlier seen a shirtless pic of TEEPO (the first pic I've seen) and he has a  huge beard;  I assumed the whole insulting back an forth thing was a joke the entire time.. calling me an idiot randomly for no reason (while being wrong) so I insulted him back.

Turns out the entire time TEEPO was super serious.

TEEEPO

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Re: Zen
« Reply #205 on: November 06, 2018, 11:07:30 AM »
i didn't really care until you told me to go shave, which i saw before you edited in the "jk, lolz". i have a history with racist white and women telling me those exact words. doesn't trigger me anymore since i started owning that shit come high school but it's still fucking hilarious you took it there over a fucking sonos speakers.

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #206 on: November 06, 2018, 11:11:54 AM »
i didn't really care until you told me to go shave, which i saw before you edited in the "jk, lolz". i have a history with racist white and women telling me those exact words. doesn't trigger me anymore since i started owning that shit come high school but it's still fucking hilarious you took it there over a fucking sonos speakers.

Well dude I'm sorry for that;  I clicked the NSFW tag on that picture you posted for like half a second on my work laptop lol.   Just looked again and honestly wouldn't be able to tell what ehtnicity you were from that pic even if I'd stared at it longingly and jerked off to it.

And literally in my head the "insult" was so out of left feild and weird I assumed you wouldn't take it remotely seriously.. since.. this was all about wirelss streaming (which you were insulting me over in multiple posts before I mentioned the shaving thing) lol

thisismyusername

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Re: Zen
« Reply #207 on: November 06, 2018, 11:19:44 AM »
Enough fighting. You two should hate fuck while riotous' Tidal sub plays Madonna.

MadonnaHumpingATableToSignThatStupidPRShit.gif

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #208 on: November 06, 2018, 11:27:43 AM »
Only if he shaves first.

shosta

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Re: Zen
« Reply #209 on: November 06, 2018, 11:32:12 AM »
"Don't worry, Teepo, nobody can tell you're Arab" is not the best way to apologize
每天生气

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #210 on: November 06, 2018, 11:48:08 AM »
"Don't worry, Teepo, nobody can tell you're Arab" is not the best way to apologize

I said I was sorry big guy :(

Stro

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Re: Zen
« Reply #211 on: November 06, 2018, 12:02:00 PM »
Audiophiles  :yuck :yuck :yuck :yuck :yuck :yuck

riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #212 on: November 06, 2018, 12:18:46 PM »
I'm far from an audiophile;  most of them would balk at the idea of streaming anything lol

I do like Tidal;  the quaility is good and I like the interface.  Also sometimes music is on it first, sometimes it's on Apple Music first so I have both. 

Yeti

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Re: Zen
« Reply #213 on: November 06, 2018, 02:52:52 PM »
This is a cursed thread, the spirit of assimilate lingers
WDW

Joe Molotov

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Re: Zen
« Reply #214 on: November 06, 2018, 03:05:59 PM »
This is a cursed thread, the spirit of assimilate lingers



©@©™

filler

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Re: Zen
« Reply #215 on: January 28, 2019, 07:11:00 AM »
"Those who are compulsively attached to the results of action cannot really enjoy what they do; they get downcast when things do not work out and cling more desperately when they do. So the Gita classifies the karma of attachment as pleasant at first, but 'bitter as poison in the end' (18:38)"
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Re: Zen
« Reply #216 on: January 30, 2019, 01:00:21 AM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #217 on: February 10, 2019, 06:58:31 PM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #218 on: March 01, 2019, 02:08:12 AM »
"To begin with, Krishna often tells Arjuna to 'renounce the fruits of action' (karma-phala):

         You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work.
         You should never engage in action for the sake of reward,
         nor should you long for inaction. Perform work in this
         world, Arjuna, as a man established within himself - with-
         out selfish attachments, and alike in success and defeat. For
         yoga is perfect evenness of mind. (2:47-48)


'Fruits,' of course, means the outcome. What Krishna means is to give up attachment to the results of what you do: that is, to give your best to every undertaking without insisting the results workout the way you want, or even what you do is pleasant or unpleasant. 'You have the right to action, but not the fruits of action.': each of us has the obligation to act rightly, but no power to dictate what is to come of what we do."
« Last Edit: March 01, 2019, 03:35:36 AM by filler »
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filler

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Re: Zen
« Reply #219 on: March 01, 2019, 02:24:44 AM »
By detachment I mean that you must not worry whether the desired result follows from your action or not, so long as your motive is pure, your means correct.

But renunciation of fruit, in no way means indifference to the result.
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riotous

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Re: Zen
« Reply #220 on: March 01, 2019, 05:46:57 PM »
 :dayum

Stro

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Re: Zen
« Reply #221 on: March 01, 2019, 05:54:13 PM »
Good to know Krishna was a tee ball coach :beli


This flute playing frick on his "it's not whether you win or lose, but how you play the game" life lesson bullshit.

filler

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Re: Zen
« Reply #222 on: March 01, 2019, 08:17:35 PM »
 :lol
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Re: Zen
« Reply #223 on: March 24, 2019, 07:40:48 PM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #224 on: April 02, 2019, 05:54:46 PM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #225 on: April 04, 2019, 05:41:44 PM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #226 on: April 04, 2019, 05:48:24 PM »
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filler

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Re: Zen
« Reply #227 on: April 04, 2019, 10:09:42 PM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #228 on: April 06, 2019, 02:27:42 AM »
"When it comes to problems of the mind. I find it is best to take them on as if I were trying to move a heavy boulder.

Rather than try to lift the entire thing at once. Instead you can chip away at it one small piece at a time, maybe even knocking away larger chunks every now and then. In due time you will find that what once seemed such a large insurmountable issue, has now been reduced to that of a small pebble or dust. It may even give you the feeling that it was not much of problem to begin with.

Now setbacks can and will happen along the way, but those pieces you chipped off don't regrow. So you can pick up right where you left off when you are ready to start working at it again "
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Re: Zen
« Reply #229 on: April 17, 2019, 04:09:54 AM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #230 on: April 20, 2019, 12:57:44 PM »
 1. Having few desires

Not extensively seeking objects of desire not yet attained is called having few desires.

Buddha said, “You monks should know that people with many desires seek to gain a lot, and therefore their afflictions are also many. Those with few desires have no seeking and no craving, so they don’t have this problem. You should cultivate having few desires even for this reason alone, to say nothing of the fact that having few desires can produce virtues. People with few desires are free from flattery and deviousness whereby they might seek to curry people’s favor, and they also are not under the compulsion of their senses. Those who act with few desires are calm, without worry or fear. Whatever the situation, there is more than enough—there is never insufficiency. Those who have few desires have nirvana.”

2. Being content

To take what one has got within bounds is called being content.

Buddha said, “O monks, if you want to shed afflictions, you should observe contentment. The state of contentment is the abode of prosperity and happiness, peace and tranquility. Those who are content may sleep on the ground and still consider it comfortable; those who are not content would be dissatisfied even in heaven. Those who are not content are always caught up in sensual desires; they are pitied by those who are content.”

3. Enjoying quietude

Leaving the clamor and staying alone in deserted places is called enjoying quietude.

Buddha said, “O monks, if you wish to seek peace and happiness of quietude and nonstriving, you should leave the clamor and live without clutter in a solitary place. People in quiet places are honored by the gods. Therefore you should leave your own group as well as other groups, stay alone in a deserted place, and think about extirpating the root of suffering. Those who like crowds suffer the vexations of crowds, just as a big tree will suffer withering and breakage when flicks of birds gather on it. Worldly ties and clinging sink you into a multitude of pains, like an old elephant sunk in the mud, unable to get itself out.”

4. Diligence

Diligently cultivating virtues without interruption is called diligence, pure and unalloyed, advancing without regression.

Buddha said, “O monks, if you make diligent efforts, nothing is hard. Therefore you should be diligent. It is like even a small stream being able to pierce rock if it continually flows. If the practitioner’s mind flags and gives up time and time again, that is like drilling for fire but stopping before heat is produced—though you want to get fire, fire can hardly be gotten this way.”

5. Unfailing recollection

This is also called keeping right mindfulness; keeping the teachings without loss is called right mindfulness, and also called unfailing recollection.

Buddha said, “O monks, if you seek a good companion and seek a good protector and helper, nothing compares to unfailing recollection. Those who have unfailing recollection cannot be invaded by the thieving afflictions. Therefore you should concentrate your thoughts and keep mindful. One who loses mindfulness loses virtues. If one’s power of mindfulness is strong, even if one enters among the thieving desires one will not be harmed by them. It is like going to the front lines wearing armor—then one has nothing to fear.”

6. Cultivating meditation concentration

Dwelling on the teaching without distraction is called meditation concentration.

Buddha said, “O monks, if you concentrate the mind, it will be in a state of stability and you will be able to know the characteristics of the phenomena arising and perishing in the world. Therefore you should energetically cultivate and learn the concentrations. If you attain concentration, your mind will not be distracted. Just as a household careful of water builds a dam, so does the practitioner, for the sake of the water of knowledge and wisdom, cultivate meditation concentration well, to prevent them from leaking.”

7. Cultivating wisdom

Developing learning, thinking, and application, the realization is wisdom.

Buddha said, “O monks, if you have wisdom, you will have no greedy attachment. Always examine yourselves and do not allow any heedlessness. Then you will be able to attain liberation from ego and things. Otherwise, you are neither people of the Way nor laypeople—there is no way to refer to you. True wisdom is a secure ship to cross the sea of aging, sickness, and death. It is also a bright lamp in the darkness of ignorance, good medicine for all the ailing, a sharp axe to fell the trees of afflictions. Therefore you should use the wisdom of learning, thinking, and application, and increase it yourself. If anyone has the illumination of wisdom, this is a person with clear eyes, even though it be the mortal eye.”

8. Not engaging in vain talk

Realizing detachment from arbitrary discrimination is called not engaging in vain talk; when one has fully comprehended the character of reality, one will not engage in vain talk.

Buddha said, “O monks, if you indulge in various kinds of vain talk, your mind will be disturbed. Even if you leave society you will still not attain liberation. Therefore you should immediately give up vain talk which disturbs the mind. If you want to attain bliss of tranquility and dispassion, you should extinguish the affliction of vain talk.”
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Nintex

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Re: Zen
« Reply #231 on: April 20, 2019, 12:59:47 PM »
Quote
Buddha said, “You monks should know that people with many desires seek to gain a lot, and therefore their afflictions are also many. Those with few desires have no seeking and no craving, so they don’t have this problem. You should cultivate having few desires even for this reason alone, to say nothing of the fact that having few desires can produce virtues. People with few desires are free from flattery and deviousness whereby they might seek to curry people’s favor, and they also are not under the compulsion of their senses. Those who act with few desires are calm, without worry or fear. Whatever the situation, there is more than enough—there is never insufficiency. Those who have few desires have nirvana.”

tfw #clownworld is nirvana  :thinking
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filler

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Re: Zen
« Reply #232 on: April 20, 2019, 05:01:55 PM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #233 on: April 21, 2019, 06:58:09 AM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #234 on: April 21, 2019, 11:53:24 PM »
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toku

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Re: Zen
« Reply #235 on: April 22, 2019, 10:16:44 AM »
sounds like bullshit to me

filler

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Re: Zen
« Reply #236 on: April 22, 2019, 05:23:21 PM »
In India, this realization has been part of a common spiritual heritage for thousands of years, fed by the personal experience of mystics from most of the world’s major religions. Hinduism and Buddhism, of course, originated there; Islam and Zoroastrianism have contributed to its culture for several centuries. Jewish communities in South India date from before the Christian era; and Christianity arrived in Kerala state, where I was born, long before it reached most of Europe – in fact, according to Church tradition, the Gospel was brought to India by the Apostle Thomas himself in the first century A.D. Indians are used to being surrounded by many paths to God, and I don’t think any people are more catholic in accepting truth in whatever religion they find it.

Against this background, there is a story about a missionary school being inspected by one of the church officials. These inspections could come at any time, and the inspector – who, of course, was usually not Indian – had the privilege of stepping unannounced into any classroom, playing the teacher, and asking whatever question he liked. In this story, an inspector steps in on an English class and says – in English – “Let me ask you three questions: One, what does God know? Two, what can he do? Three, where is he to be found?”

Most of the village children were taken by surprise: after all, it is hard enough to discuss theology in your own language, let alone in somebody else’s. But there was one little fellow at the back who really knew his spiritual heritage. He stood up and said politely, “Sir, may I ask *you* three questions?”

The examiner was a good sport, so he said yes. And the boy asked: “What does God *not* know? What can he not do? Where is he not?”

It is a simple reply, but it says a great deal. To the mystic, it is absurd to say there is no God. He is our life, our very Self; how can we deny him? Only when we think that God is something outside us is it possible to say that God does not exist.

A few years ago I remember a columnist describing his family’s trip to Europe. While they were driving through France, the children kept complaining, “Dad, when are we going to see Europe?” It is much like that with God. If you want to see the Lord, the mystics say, just look around you; what else is there? “Open your eyes,” says Hugh of St. Victor; “the world is full of God.”

The Sufis have a vivid image for this. The Lord, they say, is the Showman, but he is also the show. In Sanskrit he is Mahamayi, the Cosmic Magician, who has cast the illusion of separateness over all the universe. P.T. Barnum may have been proud of the “greatest show on earth,” but the earth itself is only a small part of the vast show that is the Lord’s. So the Hindu scriptures do not talk about God creating the world; they say that he *became* the world. It is not something different from him; it is a form which he has put on.

– Eknath Easwaran, from “The Bhagavad Gita for Daily Living, vol. 2: Like a Thousand Suns”
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Re: Zen
« Reply #237 on: May 23, 2019, 03:18:16 AM »
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Re: Zen
« Reply #238 on: October 27, 2019, 06:47:17 AM »
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The Upanishads say pithily, “Those who see all creatures in themselves and themselves in all creatures know no fear.” The idea that each of us is separate from the rest is the very source of fear. “When there is no other,” the Upanishads ask, “with whom can I be angry? Of whom can I be afraid?”

In South India, where I grew up, two things brought fear to almost every heart: snakes and ghosts. Each village had at least one ghost, and Kerala’s lush climate is as pleasant for snakes as it is for less fearsome creatures. Some of these snakes are harmless, but several are so poisonous that death can come in minutes. A rationalist might laugh at the fear of ghosts, but I would venture to say that no one from South India, however well educated, walks about in the countryside without the fear of snakes somewhere at the back of his mind.

This danger is especially real at dusk, for that is the time when snakes like to come out and enjoy the evening, just like everybody else, and in the fading sunlight it is difficult to see. At such times anyone can be excused if he suddenly jumps and cries out in fear to avoid what turns out to be only a stick or vine or piece of rope lying beside the path.

Shankara, who came from my same state of Kerala in South India, drew on such experiences to illustrate the nature of separateness and fear. When a villager sees a snake where there is only a rope, superimposing his ideas of snakeness on what he actually perceives, his fright is very real. His heart pounds and adrenaline courses through his body just as if a living cobra lay across his path. What causes that fear? Not a snake, Shankara implies, but the idea of it in the mind.

In just the same way, we often impose our fears on an innocent world. The more separate we feel from the rest of life, the more threatening it seems. Ironically, if we act threatened, we may provoke an aggressive response that seems to confirm our fears. All this falls away as meditation deepens. Your eyes clear, and you see that what you had been afraid of was a projection of your own state of mind.

– Eknath Easwaran, from “The Constant Companion”
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Re: Zen
« Reply #239 on: October 27, 2019, 07:52:12 AM »
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The mystics are not theorizing when they declare that the supreme goal of life is to become aware of the indivisible unity that is the Divine Ground of existence. They are drawing upon their own personal experience in which they have realized that all life is one.

The source of all sorrow lies in trying to resist our evolution towards this goal by maintaining our own separateness. It does not take much depth of observation, even for ordinary people like us, to discover that the person who does not merge his welfare into that of the family is usually very insecure, and so is the family in which he lives. If, for example, husband and wife try to compete with each other and maintain their separateness, they make themselves miserable, their children miserable, and even their locality miserable. In contrast, if we look at people who are secure, loved, and respected wherever they go, we usually find that they are able to base their action on an awareness that the interests of those around them are more important than their own individual interests. When I forget myself in the joy of those around me, I am fulfilling myself. It is when I try to maintain my separateness that I become more and more insecure, because my innate need, my deep, driving need, is to realize my oneness with all life.

– Eknath Easwaran, from "The Bhagavad Gita for Daily Living, vol. 1: End of Sorrow"
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