Author Topic: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles  (Read 11310 times)

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shosta

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interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« on: November 09, 2018, 09:59:23 PM »
I like reading shit. this guy is cool

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller

Quote
In the 1920s, Fuller experimented with polyphasic sleep, which he called Dymaxion sleep. Inspired by the sleep habits of animals such as dogs and cats,[74]:133 Fuller worked until he was tired, and then slept short naps. This generally resulted in Fuller sleeping 30-minute naps every 6 hours.[69]:160 This allowed him "twenty-two thinking hours a day", which aided his work productivity.[69]:160 Fuller reportedly kept this Dymaxion sleep habit for two years, before quitting the routine because it conflicted with his business associates' sleep habits.[75] Despite no longer personally partaking in the habit, in 1943 Fuller suggested Dymaxion sleep as a strategy that the United States could adopt to win World War II.[75]
:lol
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Great Rumbler

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2018, 10:21:53 PM »
The Urantia Book (sometimes called The Urantia Papers or The Fifth Epochal Revelation) is a spiritual and philosophical book that originated in Chicago sometime between 1924 and 1955. The authorship remains a matter of speculation and it has received criticism from both the scientific and religious communities as being inaccurate.
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benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2018, 10:49:08 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Chronology_(Fomenko)
Quote
The New Chronology is a pseudohistorical theory which argues that the conventional chronology of Middle Eastern and European history is fundamentally flawed, and that events attributed to the civilizations of the Roman Empire, Ancient Greece and Ancient Egypt actually occurred during the Middle Ages, more than a thousand years later.

...

According to Fomenko's claims, the written history of humankind goes only as far back as AD 800, there is almost no information about events between AD 800–1000, and most known historical events took place in AD 1000–1500.
Quote
according to Fomenko the word "Rome" is a placeholder and can signify any one of several different cities and kingdoms. He claims the "First Rome" or "Ancient Rome" or "Mizraim" is an ancient Egyptian kingdom in the delta of the Nile with its capital in Alexandria. The second and most famous "New Rome" is Constantinople. The third "Rome" is constituted by three different cities: Constantinople (again), Rome in Italy, and Moscow. According to his claims, Rome in Italy was founded around AD 1380 by Aeneas and Moscow as the third Rome was the capital of the great "Russian Horde"

jakefromstatefarm

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2018, 11:04:51 PM »
Quote
Billington writes that the theory "might have quietly blown away in the wind tunnels of academia" if not for Kasparov's writing in support of it in the magazine Ogoniok.
man. what’s with chess masters and being a complete crank?

Great Rumbler

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2018, 11:56:16 PM »
Quote
In 2004 at the Moscow International Book Fair, Anatoly Fomenko with his coauthor Gleb Nosovsky were awarded for their books on "New Chronology" the anti-prize called "Abzatz" (literally 'paragraph', a Russian slang word meaning 'disaster' or 'fiasco') in the category "Pochotnaya bezgramota" (the term is a pun upon "Pochotnaya gramota" (Certificate of Honor) and may be translated either "Certificate of Dishonor" or literally, "Respectable Illiteracy" ) for the worst book published in Russia.

 :heh
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benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2018, 12:24:39 AM »
There is just an awesome bunch of garbage that has come out of the social sciences in Russian academia in the post-Soviet period. History especially is full of it, I assume because for 80 years or so it was so controlled and set down by the state that basically you didn't have to learn actual historiographical practices just repeating the "Marxist-Leninist" truth as laid down by higher ups and you'd advance to prestigious positions.

Then when the Soviet system collapsed (and it lingered a bit longer in social science academia out of inertia), it freed them all up to publish their TRUE LIFE'S WORK finally. Like you can see on the Wiki page, The New Chronology is like this box set of giant 800 page historical tomes full of charts and diagrams and maps, not some single 300 page crank book or wild revisionist theory like would be more standard in the West. And it's taken seriously by all kinds of "certified" people in high positions, they get great reviews, etc. We obviously have own our issues in academia but the Eastern European social sciences can be seriously wild because in some ways they're like a century or more behind in figuring out methodology. A lot of their stuff looks more like what we were publishing in the late 19th century. Like the guy who wrote that geopolitics book in the late 90s (along with a bunch of other fantastic stuff) that popular media in the West discovered last year finally, and it got a bunch of play from the 100 part message Twitter people as PUTINS SECRET PLAN WITH TRUMP and whatever.

So it can be just totally awesome. Real problem is more getting it translated, because it's not really going to get translated for publication here, so you're relying on the true believers. :lawd

benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2018, 12:28:25 AM »
Actually now that I mention it, I hear there's in general a lot of good stuff like this available from all over Asia for a lot of the same reasons. I guess even someplace like India, which we usually consider to be more "ahead" of the others because of its Commonwealth ties, is actually not really any different in this regard. And as much as we make a big deal of soft vs. hard sciences for political hay, there is at least that check of "shit has to not break" that can let these nations have respectable academics in maths, physics, etc. while history is full of insane people. (In other words, it's exactly the same as here.)

I have to imagine North Korea potentially has the best stuff. Oh man...

benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2018, 12:36:30 AM »
Like the guy who wrote that geopolitics book in the late 90s (along with a bunch of other fantastic stuff) that popular media in the West discovered last year finally, and it got a bunch of play from the 100 part message Twitter people as PUTINS SECRET PLAN WITH TRUMP and whatever.
This guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr_Dugin

Quote
In June 2012, Dugin said in a lecture that chemistry and physics are demonic sciences, and that all Orthodox Russians need to unite around the President of the Russian Federation in the last battle between good and evil, following the example of Iran and North Korea.[72] He added, "If we want to liberate ourselves from the West, it is needed to liberate ourselves from textbooks on physics and chemistry."

Quote
In one of his publications, Dugin introduced the term the sixth column and defined it as "the fifth column which just pretends to be something different"
:rollsafe


Nintex

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2018, 06:55:37 AM »
Like the guy who wrote that geopolitics book in the late 90s (along with a bunch of other fantastic stuff) that popular media in the West discovered last year finally, and it got a bunch of play from the 100 part message Twitter people as PUTINS SECRET PLAN WITH TRUMP and whatever.
This guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr_Dugin

Quote
In June 2012, Dugin said in a lecture that chemistry and physics are demonic sciences, and that all Orthodox Russians need to unite around the President of the Russian Federation in the last battle between good and evil, following the example of Iran and North Korea.[72] He added, "If we want to liberate ourselves from the West, it is needed to liberate ourselves from textbooks on physics and chemistry."

Quote
In one of his publications, Dugin introduced the term the sixth column and defined it as "the fifth column which just pretends to be something different"
:rollsafe
When things were heating up in Ukraine there was this Russian official (might've been the speaker of the Duma or whatever) who was interviewed and said that World War 3 was inevitable.
He rambled something about this being the 'age of technology' like the last age was the 'age of industry' and each age he said would end in a massive war.

Even I was shocked by how convinced he was of this theory. "It can't be helped, it is the natural order of things"
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Great Rumbler

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2018, 10:52:58 AM »
mods please change benji's name to "respectable illiteracy" pls thx
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Raist

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2018, 09:42:42 AM »
There is just an awesome bunch of garbage that has come out of the social sciences

Agreed.


Mr Gilhaney

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2018, 12:02:00 PM »

CatsCatsCats

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2018, 12:10:35 PM »
TIL Wikipedia is not shy about naughty bits

Stro

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2018, 12:19:04 PM »
Wiki has lots of pics of genitals and sex positions

Raist

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benjipwns

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Valkyrie

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2018, 04:02:12 AM »

benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2018, 11:15:05 PM »
triggered by post i quoted in garbage thread reminded me of this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermeneutic_style#England

Quote
Æthelstan's court was the centre of a revival of the elaborate hermeneutic style of later Latin writers, influenced by the West Saxon scholar Aldhelm (c.639–709), and by early tenth-century French monasticism. Foreign scholars at Æthelstan's court such as Israel the Grammarian were practitioners. The style was characterised by long, convoluted sentences and a predilection for rare words and neologisms.
Quote
David Woodman gives a translation of the start of a charter drafted by "Æthelstan A", S 416 issued on 12 November 931:

The lamentable and loudly detestable sins of this tottering age, surrounded by the dire barkings of obscene and fearsome mortality, challenge and urge us, not carefree in a homeland where peace has been attained but, as it were, teetering over an abyss of fetid corruption, that we should flee those things not only by despising them together with their misfortunes with the whole effort of our mind but also by hating them just like the wearisome nausea of melancholy, striving towards that Gospel text, "Give and it will be given unto you"
Quote
In the late tenth century, Latin had higher prestige than Anglo-Saxon, and hermeneutic Latin had higher prestige than simple Latin. This presented Byrhtferth with a problem in his Enchiridion, a school text designed to teach the complicated rules for calculating the date of Easter, as hermeneutic Latin is unsuitable for pedagogic instruction. His solution was to include passages in hermeneutic Latin condemning the ignorant and lazy secular clergy, who he said refused to learn Latin, thus justifying using Anglo-Saxon to provide clear explanations for their benefit.[35] In a passage in Latin he wrote:

Some ignorant clerics reject calculations of this kind (for shame!) and do not wish to keep their phylacteries, that is, they do not preserve the order, which they have received in the bosom of mother church, nor do they persist in the holy teaching of meditation. They should consider carefully the way of the Pharisees and the Sadducees, and they should spit out their doctrine like filth. A cleric ought to be the keeper of his own soul, just as a noble man subjects a young foal to the yoke, so he ought to subject his own soul to service, by filling the alabaster box with precious oil, that is, he ought to be inwardly subjected daily, by obeying the divine laws and admonitions of the Redeemer.

also my desperate need to determine if this is intentional or not:
Quote
The historian W. H. Stevenson commented in 1898:

The object of the compilers of these charters was to express their meaning by the use of the greatest possible number of words and by the choice of the most grandiloquent, bombastic words they could find. Every sentence is so overloaded by the heaping up of unnecessary words that the meaning is almost buried out of sight. The invocation with its appended clauses, opening with pompous and partly alliterative words, will proceed amongst a blaze of verbal fireworks throughout twenty lines of smallish type, and the pyrotechnic display will be maintained with equal magnificence throughout the whole charter, leaving the reader, dazzled by the glaze and blinded by the smoke, in a state of uncertainty as to the meaning of these frequently untranslatable and usually interminable sentences.

EightBitNate

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2018, 11:54:10 PM »
When I was a pre-teen and hadn’t figured out porn yet I messaged the user that uploaded pics to the breast Wikipedia article, letting them know how nice I thought they were.

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benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2018, 12:22:04 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constantine_Copronymus

Quote
Constantine's avowed enemies over this bitterly contested religious issue, the iconodules, applied to him the derogatory epithet Kopronymos ("dung-named", from kopros, meaning "feces" or "animal dung", and onoma, "name"). Using this obscene name, they spread the rumour that as an infant he had defecated in his baptismal font, or on the imperial purple cloth with which he was swaddled.

shosta

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2018, 12:46:45 PM »
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panopticon

Quote
The Panopticon is a type of institutional building and a system of control designed by the English philosopher and social theorist Jeremy Bentham in the late 18th century. The scheme of the design is to allow all (pan-) inmates of an institution to be observed (-opticon) by a single watchman without the inmates being able to tell whether or not they are being watched. Although it is physically impossible for the single watchman to observe all the inmates' cells at once, the fact that the inmates cannot know when they are being watched means that they are motivated to act as though they are being watched at all times. Thus, they are effectively compelled to regulate their own behaviour.
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Stro

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shosta

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2018, 02:05:48 PM »

lol
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Joe Molotov

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2018, 03:40:48 PM »
that ain't it, chief
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benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2018, 04:39:46 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duty_on_Hair_Powder_Act_1795
Quote
The Act stated that everyone wishing to use hair powder must, from 5 May 1795, visit a stamp office to enter their name and pay for an annual certificate costing one guinea. Certain exemptions were included: the Royal Family and their servants, clergymen with an income of under £100 a year, subalterns, non-commissioned officers, privates in the army, artillery, militia, mariners, engineers, fencibles, officers in the navy below commander, yeomanry, and volunteers. A father with more than two unmarried daughters might buy two certificates which would be valid for any number he stated at the stamp office. The master of a household might buy a certificate for a member of his servants which would also be valid for their successors within that year.

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #28 on: November 26, 2018, 04:42:46 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/11_foot_8_Bridge

Quote
The 11 foot 8 Bridge (formally known as the Norfolk Southern–Gregson Street Overpass and nicknamed The Can-Opener) is a railroad bridge in Durham, North Carolina, United States, that has attracted media coverage and popular attention because tall vehicles such as trucks and RVs frequently collide with the unusually low overpass, resulting in damage ranging from RV roof air conditioners being scraped off to entire truck roofs being removed.[1] The 78-year-old bridge along South Gregson Street provides only 11 feet 8 inches (3.56 m) of vertical clearance.[2] It cannot be raised because nearby railroad crossings would also have to be raised with it. The street also cannot be lowered because a major sewer line runs only four feet (1.2 m) under Gregson Street.[3]

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2018, 04:43:33 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_left

Quote
A Michigan left is an at-grade intersection design that replaces each left turn at an intersection between a (major) divided roadway and a secondary (minor) roadway, with the combination of a right turn followed by a U-turn, or a U-turn followed by a right turn, depending on the situation.

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2018, 04:44:11 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Y%27all_Water_Tower

Quote
The Florence Y'all Water Tower is a water tower owned by the city of Florence, Kentucky, United States. It stands between the Florence Mall and interstate highways 75 and 71,[1] where it is seen by millions of interstate motorists annually. The 1974 tower, originally painted with the words FLORENCE MALL in giant letters, became a regional landmark after the M was changed to Y' to address legal concerns.

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2018, 04:45:06 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Kee_Building

Quote
The Sam Kee Building, located at 8 West Pender Street in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is the "shallowest commercial building in the world" according to the Guinness Book of Records.[1]

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #32 on: November 26, 2018, 04:46:14 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whittier,_Alaska

Quote
Whittier is a city at the head of the Passage Canal in the U.S. state of Alaska, about 58 miles southeast of Anchorage.[5] The city is within the Valdez–Cordova Census Area. At the 2010 census the population was 220, up from 182 in 2000. The 2016 estimate was 214 people, almost all of whom live in a single building.[6] Whittier is also a port for the Alaska Marine Highway.[7]

benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #33 on: November 26, 2018, 04:52:49 PM »
Quote
The two buildings that dominate the town were built after World War II. The 14-story Hodge Building (renamed Begich Towers) was completed in 1957 and contains 150 two- and three-bedroom apartments plus bachelor efficiency units. Dependent families and Civil Service employees were moved into this high-rise. The Whittier School was connected by a tunnel at the base of the west tower so students could safely access school on days with bad weather. The building was named in honor of Colonel Walter William Hodge, who was a civil engineer and the commanding officer of 93rd Engineer Regiment on the Alcan Highway.[10]

The other main structure in town, the Buckner Building, was completed in 1953, and was called the "city under one roof". The Buckner Building was eventually abandoned. Buckner and Begich Towers were at one time the largest buildings in Alaska. The Begich Building became a condominium, and along with the two-story private residence known as Whittier Manor, houses a majority of the town's residents
With most of the community and its services either inside of or connected to the building, residents are able to remain inside the building for long periods of time if the weather is inclement, or they simply do not want to leave.
After the military left, the ownership of the Buckner Building went through a handful of people.[10] At one point, it was owned by one Pete Zamarillo who wanted to turn it into the state prison. In 1972 it was purchased by the citizens of the new City of Whittier and soon fell into disrepair.[6][10] With the windows and doors missing, the elements began to take it over, water infiltrated, leaving the building in a constant state of freezing and thawing.[11] In 2016 the building went into foreclosure and the city assumed ownership. There is now a fence around the building to keep trespassers out.[10] The Whittier Department of Public Works and Public Utilities have done some work. The city would like to maintain it to preserve history but the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation recommends that the building be torn down.

awwww sweet, i have a thing for giant abandoned buildings:

Joe Molotov

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #34 on: November 26, 2018, 04:53:55 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whittier,_Alaska

Quote
Whittier is a city at the head of the Passage Canal in the U.S. state of Alaska, about 58 miles southeast of Anchorage.[5] The city is within the Valdez–Cordova Census Area. At the 2010 census the population was 220, up from 182 in 2000. The 2016 estimate was 214 people, almost all of whom live in a single building.[6] Whittier is also a port for the Alaska Marine Highway.[7]

Is that building the Palin Compound?
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benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #35 on: November 26, 2018, 04:56:13 PM »
Quote
In July 1974, state Bureau of Highways officials told the city that the tower's sign was illegal because it advertised something which didn't yet exist[3].

Among the discussed possibilities were repainting the tower or covering the words with a large tarpaulin. With time running out to comply with the law, civil staff met for a brainstorming session at the Stringtown Restaurant with the late C.M. "Hop" Ewing (d.2006), then Mayor of Florence, who "sketched different ideas on a napkin".[4] Ewing ultimately devised the idea of removing the vertical lines at the sides of the M in MALL, adding a stem to make it a Y and adding an apostrophe; resulting in "Y'ALL". ...

The publicity surrounding the Florence Y'all tower advertised the mall better than a passive sign alone. On the mall's opening day in late 1976, mall-goers created a traffic jam at the Kentucky Route 18 exit from I-75.[2]
:dead

benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #36 on: November 26, 2018, 04:57:52 PM »
Quote
The building is considered the shallowest commercial building in the world by the Guinness Book of Records and was formerly also viewed as such by Ripley's Believe it or Not!, but in recent years this status has been challenged by the "Skinny Building" in Pittsburgh.[4][5] The dispute centres around the fact that while the Sam Kee Building's width varies from floor to floor, Pittsburgh's "Skinny Building" is 5'2" (1.57 m) wide on all floors.
:punch

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #37 on: November 26, 2018, 05:02:51 PM »
Oh shit.

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #38 on: November 26, 2018, 05:03:58 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutral_Moresnet

Quote
Neutral Moresnet (French pronunciation: ​[mɔ.ʁɛ.nɛ]) was a small Belgian–Prussian condominium in central-western Europe that existed from 1816 to 1920 and was jointly administered by the United Kingdom of the Netherlands (Belgium after its independence in 1830) and the Kingdom of Prussia. After 1830, the territory's northernmost border point at Vaalserberg connected it to a quadripoint shared additionally with the Dutch Province of Limburg, the Prussian Rhine Province, and the Belgian Province of Liège.[1] Today it is known as the Three-Country Point, being the meeting place of the borders of Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands.


benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #39 on: November 26, 2018, 05:04:17 PM »
The standard should be: how many Ben Shapiro's can lay down across the floor of the Sam Kee or Skinny buildings.

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #40 on: November 26, 2018, 05:04:35 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedlec_Ossuary

Quote
The Sedlec Ossuary (Czech: Kostnice v Sedlci) is a small Roman Catholic chapel, located beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints (Czech: Hřbitovní kostel Všech Svatých), part of the former Sedlec Abbey in Sedlec, a suburb of Kutná Hora in the Czech Republic. The ossuary is estimated to contain the skeletons of between 40,000 and 70,000 people, whose bones have, in many cases, been artistically arranged to form decorations and furnishings for the chapel. The ossuary is among the most visited tourist attractions of the Czech Republic - attracting over 200,000 visitors annually.[1]

benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #41 on: November 26, 2018, 05:05:18 PM »
Quote
The area is especially of interest to Esperantists because of initiatives in the early 20th century to found an Esperanto‑speaking state, named Amikejo (lit. Place of Friendship), on the territory of Neutral Moresnet.
gross

Philip Cardgage

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #42 on: November 26, 2018, 05:06:47 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Bonifas

Quote
There is a par 3 one-hole "golf course" at the camp which includes an Astroturf green and is surrounded on three sides by minefields.[3] Sports Illustrated called it "the most dangerous hole in golf" and there are reports that at least one shot exploded a land mine.[3]

Joe Molotov

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #43 on: November 26, 2018, 05:35:52 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fart_(word)

Quote
The English word fart is one of the oldest words in the English lexicon.
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shosta

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #44 on: November 28, 2018, 10:32:55 PM »
Not Wikipedia but still made me laugh
Why is payroll hard?
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shosta

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curly

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #46 on: November 30, 2018, 02:26:14 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quipu

When I first learned about these it blew my mind that it was possibly a "written" language made up of knots

BisMarckie

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #47 on: November 30, 2018, 06:52:43 AM »
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ems_Dispatch

Quote
Bismarck took it upon himself to edit the report, sharpening the language. He cut out Wilhelm’s conciliatory phrases; [...] It was designed to give the French the impression that King Wilhelm I had insulted Count Benedetti; likewise, the Germans interpreted the modified dispatch as the Count insulting the King.

Bismarck had viewed the worsening relations with France with open satisfaction. If war had to come, now was as good a time as any. His editing, he assured his friends, "would have the effect of a red rag on the Gallic [French] bull."[8] The edited telegram was to be presented henceforth as the cause of the war.[9]


Bismarck :rejoice
« Last Edit: November 30, 2018, 06:57:06 AM by KennyLoggins »

benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #48 on: December 01, 2018, 03:12:33 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sark
Quote
Sark was considered the last feudal state in Europe. Together with the other Channel Islands, it is the last remnant of the former Duchy of Normandy still belonging to the Crown. Sark belongs to the Crown in its own right and has an independent relationship with the Crown through the Lieutenant Governor in Guernsey.[38] Formally, the Seigneur holds it as a fief from the Crown, reenfeoffing the landowners on the island with their respective parcels. The political consequences of this construction were abolished in recent years, particularly in the reform of the legislative body, Chief Pleas, which took place in 2008.
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Until 2008, Sark's parliament (Chief Pleas) was a single chamber consisting of 54 members, comprising the Seigneur, the Seneschal, 40 owners of the Tenements and 12 elected deputies. A change to the system was advocated largely by the Barclay brothers, who had purchased an island within Sark's territorial waters in 1993[17] along with the hotels on the island.[21] Their premise was that a change was necessary to comply with the European Convention on Human Rights though it was suggested that their objection was more likely at odds with certain property tax requirements and primogeniture laws affecting their holdings.


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In August 1990, an unemployed French nuclear physicist named André Gardes armed with a semi-automatic weapon attempted an invasion of Sark. The night Gardes arrived, he put up two posters declaring his intention to take over the island the following day at noon. The following day he started a solo foot patrol in front of the manor in battle-dress with weapon in hand. While Gardes was sitting on a bench waiting for noon to arrive, the island's volunteer connétable approached the Frenchman and complimented him on the quality of his weapon.[17] Gardes then proceeded to change the gun's magazine, at which point he was tackled to the ground, arrested, and given a seven-day sentence which he served in Guernsey.[17][18][19][20] Gardes attempted a comeback the following year, but was intercepted in Guernsey.

Kara

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #49 on: December 01, 2018, 04:12:47 AM »

shosta

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #50 on: December 01, 2018, 03:44:27 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugchasing

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Bugchasing, also known in slang as charging, is the practice of pursuing sexual activity with HIV-positive individuals in order to contract HIV. Individuals engaged in this activity are referred to as bugchasers. It is a form of self-harm. Bugchasers seek sexual partners who are HIV-positive for the purpose of having unprotected sex and becoming HIV-positive; giftgivers are HIV-positive individuals who comply with the bugchasers' efforts to become infected with HIV.

Bugchasers indicate various reasons for this activity. Some bugchasers engage in the activity for the excitement and intimacy inherent in pursuing such a dangerous activity, but do not implicitly desire to contract HIV.[1][2] Some researchers suggest that the behavior may stem from a "resistance to dominant heterosexual norms and mores" due to a defensive response by gay men to repudiate stigmatization and rejection by society.[2]

Some people consider bugchasing "intensely erotic" and the act of being infected through the "fuck of death" as the "ultimate taboo, the most extreme sex act left."[3] People who are HIV negative and in a relationship with someone who is HIV-positive may seek infection as a way to remain in the relationship, particularly when the HIV-positive partner may wish to break up to avoid infecting the HIV negative partner.[citation needed]

Others have suggested that some people who feel lonely desire the nurturing community and social services that support people with HIV/AIDS.[2] It has also been used as a form of suicide.
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benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #51 on: December 02, 2018, 04:24:26 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bosnian_pyramid_claims

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Since 2005,[2] Semir Osmanagić, also known as Sam Osmanagich, a Bosnian businessman now based in Houston, Texas,[3] has claimed that these hills are the largest human-made ancient pyramids on Earth.
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Osmanagić initiated excavations in 2006 and has since reshaped one of the hills, making it look like a stepped pyramid.

shosta

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #52 on: December 02, 2018, 05:45:49 PM »
https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2324
Quote
   Any attempt to brew coffee with a teapot should result in the error
   code "418 I'm a teapot". The resulting entity body MAY be short and
   stout.
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Kara

  • It was all going to be very admirable and noble and it would show us - philosophically - what it means to be human.
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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #53 on: December 03, 2018, 11:48:18 AM »
You really can't understate how profoundly dumb the U.K. is as a polity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chief_Mouser_to_the_Cabinet_Office

Raist

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #54 on: December 03, 2018, 01:07:28 PM »
You think having an official kitty at the PM's residence is bad?

To this day, they clip the wings of the ravens housed at the Tower, because the legend says the day the ravens leave, the monarchy will fall.

shosta

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #55 on: December 05, 2018, 03:10:06 PM »
from a book on the first anatarctic voyage
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By the end of July they were living mainly on penguin meat, with a marked improvement in the crew. Gerlache, the captain, was the last to consent, and thus the last to be cured, but soon offered rewards to the crew for bringing in penguins for the larder—one frank for living birds, fifty centimes for dead ones. This was easy money, as it turned out. The crew learned in their final months that they could summon both penguins and seals to the ship by simply playing a tune on their cornet.

At meal time, a cornet is used to call the men together, and the penguins, it seems, also like the music; for when they hear it they make directly for the ship, and remain as long as the music lasts, but leave once it ceases. In this manner we have only to wait and seize our visitor to obtain penguin steaks, which are, just at present, the prize of the menu.

One of his men pulled out a banjo and began playing “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” which, as Shackleton recounts in South, “The solemn looking little birds appeared to appreciate.” The bagpipe, however, was another story, and when a Scottish member of the expedition began to play the national instrument, the Adelies “fled in terror and plunged back into the sea.”
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shosta

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #56 on: December 08, 2018, 09:27:58 PM »
Had no idea Rome had a bread dole
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cura_Annonae
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The dole in the early Roman Empire is estimated to account for 15 to 33 percent of the total grain imported and consumed in Rome.

It's just weird for me because I always assumed history was a march toward socialism, not away from it. Populist Roman politics in general is stuff I had simply never heard of.
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Madrun Badrun

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #57 on: December 08, 2018, 09:36:04 PM »
Had no idea Rome had a bread dole
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cura_Annonae
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The dole in the early Roman Empire is estimated to account for 15 to 33 percent of the total grain imported and consumed in Rome.

It's just weird for me because I always assumed history was a march toward socialism, not away from it. Populist Roman politics in general is stuff I had simply never heard of.

you never heard this phrase?  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bread_and_circuses
NtGay

shosta

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #58 on: December 08, 2018, 09:38:21 PM »
nope
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benjipwns

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Re: interesting and/or fun wikipedia articles
« Reply #59 on: December 08, 2018, 09:42:51 PM »
It's just weird for me because I always assumed history was a march toward socialism
Yeah, that was Karl's assumption too.