Author Topic: Musicality thread of learning to play, music theory, and never enough practice  (Read 1770 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Stro

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #60 on: January 02, 2019, 07:52:45 PM »
Don't let his hate and rage infect that beautiful piece, Ronito

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #61 on: January 02, 2019, 08:22:19 PM »
Puppy any tips for classical guitar? Itís my goal to get one this year and learn some classical.
4 things and they're contradictory, but that's what it is

:trumps

1) Skip the serious guitar school books like Parkening, Sagregas, Schearer or heaven forbid, what I learned from the Pujol Guitar school (hundreds of pages across multi-volume crap that would put the most boring person to sleep). If you already know your away around, don't waste the time. My friend Scott wrote an excellent book that covers methodology well enough without getting too serious
https://www.amazon.com/Pumping-Nylon-Classical-Guitarists-Technique/dp/1470631385

In essence: Don't get caught up in technique and it doesn't have to be a slog to learn. Also keep in mind that there's no one way to classical guitar proficiency.

2) While I'm telling you to not get too serious about the method, you have to be serious about what you intend to play. You can't get into a piece without planning. This is classical music, you can't "wing it". For example, here's a pic of my first day at a bach fugue (notice, I only did one page, I didn't touch the second page until my planning for the first page was done).


And that's day 1. By the time it's "Performance ready" It's much much worse. Also, keep in mind you gotta start SLOW. A piece when I start it sounds like nothing. I usually start playing at about at 5th or slower speed and then work up.  Don't go into a piece thinking you can just play it.

3) Start small. Everyone wants to get to Bach and Albeniz and the cool stuff. Cool your heels. Find some easy pieces you like and get those 100% right before moving to other stuff

4) I just said there's no one way to guitar proficiency, BUT if you can do these sets of studies/etudes a performance grade you're ready for almost anything. My professor insisted I be able to do all these before I could move to a non-etude piece. It was a painful 18 month slog, but after I could do all these I was ready for anything. They're listed in the order I'd approach it in.  Now I wouldn't suggest you go full bear like my teacher and not play anything else til these are done. But I'd suggest always have a few of these in your practicing.

Guliani's 120 Arpeggios


Brouwer's 12 simple Etude's


Sor's 24 Etudes (The Segovian Selections)


Villa-Lobo's 12 Etudes


que

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #62 on: January 02, 2019, 08:25:06 PM »
Iíll do the narration for you.
Combine your crazy schedule with mine? Dude, we'll be ready in 2022. LOL.
que

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #63 on: January 02, 2019, 08:25:45 PM »
I'm gonna try to work on learning some Wolfhart studies. A guitar player I really admire recommended those.
prick

Cindi Mayweather

  • You gonna scroll past this post without saying howdy?
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #64 on: January 02, 2019, 09:05:49 PM »
Thanks Puppy. I have learned a few arpeggios. I can get started on this on my tele right?

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #65 on: January 02, 2019, 09:23:03 PM »
in the new year Agrajag is going to tune out all the negativity. When Jack goes low, I am going high!

So, Tasty, in this giving spirit, I will recommend you one of my favorite Youtubers. You may not necessarily learn much from her videos, as they're not really instructional in nature, but as a lover of piano/music I think you will enjoy it a lot.

prick

Cindi Mayweather

  • You gonna scroll past this post without saying howdy?
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #66 on: January 02, 2019, 09:44:01 PM »
Puppy, does learning classical guitar also help with proficiency in other genres? Like for instance, Jazz? Or even metal?

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #67 on: January 02, 2019, 09:53:27 PM »
Wow, this thread kinda exploded. Glad to see so much interest. :)

I'm trying to gear my brain as much as possible for the long haul (30+ years), though I'm setting achievable goals for the next year (and some rough ideas for the next five years.) Keeping up with it consistently is going to be extremely difficult.

Mostly, I just want to express myself through music, and play covers of my favorite songs. I'm not really that musical by nature and composition isn't in my blood, but I'm hoping once I get a solid backing in music theory it'll become more science than pure art -- and thus I'll be able to wrap my head around creating melodies and eventually songs.

But in any case I'm not expecting to compose much until a few years down the line at least. In addition to the odd modern song cover I learn, I also intend to get a grip on the classics. If anyone has some good intro classical pieces my ears are open. :D

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #68 on: January 02, 2019, 10:01:26 PM »
Yeah Tasty, it's best to set smaller, achievable goals for yourself and just keep it moving.

Myself, hopefully if the cash flow allows it, I want to buy some new equipment this year. I am looking at Solar guitars, which is a newer brand that is high quality, but very affordable. Additionally a new laptop and a good interface, maybe a cheap mixer and some software, so I could start recording some stuff. The software has a learning curve in itself, and I will need to start learning how to program drum loops. Bass I pretty much can play, but that's another investment. In addition, I am going to be extremely busy with work in the second half of the year, so we'll see. Baby steps.
prick

Cindi Mayweather

  • You gonna scroll past this post without saying howdy?
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #69 on: January 02, 2019, 10:25:08 PM »
I know it can be a slog, but I highly suggest not getting too carried away with yourself too fast too soon, Tasty. Keep it small. The most fundamental parts of music learning are things that are actually the most boring such as scales. "I'm not that musical by nature and composition isn't in my blood." You're just learning the basics and you're too early in the game to be worrying about that. Worry about mastering your scales till they're tip top shape and working on execution. :) Have fun with it.

I'm not familiar with piano as I haven't learned to play it but some pretty famous classical piano songs that are commonly embraced by teachers in my experience are things like:









These are common beginner piano songs that you hear any beginner pianist learning.

These are all songs that are ingrained in the societal culture footprint so you should know how they go as a 27 year old, which will only help learning them faster.

Cindi Mayweather

  • You gonna scroll past this post without saying howdy?
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #70 on: January 02, 2019, 10:31:35 PM »
Also, I have no idea if piano has uhhhh like finger numbers or something. For trombone, when I first learned it in 6th grade, we often learned by position. Say, position 4, or position 7. So position 1 is F on trombone. Rather than knowing notes I'd know the positions. In the end, this limits your ability as a player and when I would compete and get training from my private teacher, it would make things harder to learn. When learning saxophone and later, guitar, I avoided learning by lazy short hands. On sax it's pretty damn hard to do, but on guitar it's popular to use tabs or say "1st string or 5th string" rather than know the exact note. Learn your notes and if it uses a short hand thing that allows some finger chart or whatever, give it the finger and throw it in the trash because it is trash. Learn the notes and learn to read your music. Don't bother with any "easy" fingering. It's always a waste of time and a detriment any long-term music ability.

My opinion of course.

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #71 on: January 02, 2019, 10:38:52 PM »
Good vids Queen, will add them to my WL list.

My early goals are really simple and mostly involve just sticking with and completing (as in, playing as the teacher intends) my five Udemy courses and finishing some ebooks. As a bonus / for fun I go on Flowkey to practice covers I'm interested in.

In a month or two I intend to get a real IRL teacher who will be able to guide my through that phase of my learning better, but for now I'm content with learning non-interactively and memorizing some recognizable pop songs to somewhat-impress family (even if it's babby level and half speed, haha.)

No, I didn't say I am a great sight reader, but that wasn't in your post that I quoted. That's a whole different skillset that I am not proficient in, and truthfully have no interest, as I have no desire to do any kind of gigs in a professional capacity. Too old for that and too late in the game. If you think you'll be able to do that in a year's time, more power to you.

I will say, the prospect of being able to easily read and understand sheet music is 20-35% of my motivation for learning piano. Usually with something I don't understand, I can wrap my brain around it, but even since I was a kid sheet music through my soft, rhythmless mind for a loop.

The Music Theory for Dummies book has been super-helpful at getting the basics across and I'm pretty happy with how my sight reading is developing (barely nonexistent for now, but has a promising future.)

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #72 on: January 02, 2019, 10:43:25 PM »
I learned to sight read a long time ago, but didn't keep practicing it, so it's a chore now. Scratch that, it was always a chore for me, my guitar teacher would only write things out in standard notation, and it always felt like boring homework to me. I would end up cheating and memorize the lines, so he would think I am reading the music, but I would be playing it by memory or by ear. He was probably very frustrated with me.

Knowing how to read is incredibly helpful if you are trying to learn piano pieces, so keep doing your thing man.
prick

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #73 on: January 02, 2019, 11:51:49 PM »
Daily Status: 2019-01-02

- Completed Section #2 of Beginner Piano on Udemy, bringing me to 22% completion for the course.
- Learned how to find any key (A-G) on the piano using some brain tricks. I can name any key now! :)
- Practiced the right hand intro to "Auld Lang Syne" on Flowkey (beginner level.)

Glen

  • Unban Cream
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #74 on: January 03, 2019, 10:29:40 AM »
I wrote a somewhat decent piano piece in C minor which at one point modulates to C major. First time I've actually written a key change. Also my first time using C minor. It's a nice key.

I also charted the piece out, which was the first time I've written anything down.

I played through the C major scale across the guitar neck with a focus on understanding the notes. I've always been able to improvise by ear, and I've played some pretty good solos in band performances and jam sessions, but I didn't necessarily know exactly what I was playing from a theoretical perspective. I'm going through the scales focusing on stuff like, where is the root note? Where is the 4th, the 5th, etc? What notes are in this lick, and how do they relate to the scale?

I've always been too lazy to do this kind of stuff in the past, and relied way too heavily on my ear. Time to fix that.

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #75 on: January 03, 2019, 12:03:57 PM »
Gmaj/Em had always been my rut on guitar
prick

shosta

  • just a thought
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #76 on: January 03, 2019, 12:14:08 PM »
Daily Status: 2019-01-02

- Completed Section #2 of Beginner Piano on Udemy, bringing me to 22% completion for the course.
- Learned how to find any key (A-G) on the piano using some brain tricks. I can name any key now! :)
- Practiced the right hand intro to "Auld Lang Syne" on Flowkey (beginner level.)
nice. Pretty soon you'll be playing this


agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #77 on: January 03, 2019, 12:24:33 PM »
I want Andy to serenade us with some saccharine Schoenberg ballads.
prick

Dufus

  • Harvester of Likes
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #78 on: January 03, 2019, 12:34:35 PM »
so what's the difference between piano and keyboard

if you learn to play piano, doesn't that mean you can also play keyboard and vice versa?

shosta

  • just a thought
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #79 on: January 03, 2019, 12:40:30 PM »
Learning how to play a piano means you'll be able to play a keyboard and vice versa, maybe minus some pedals.

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #80 on: January 03, 2019, 12:40:55 PM »
one is an acoustic instrument, the other electronic.
prick

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #81 on: January 03, 2019, 01:29:51 PM »
Puppy, does learning classical guitar also help with proficiency in other genres? Like for instance, Jazz? Or even metal?
Certainly the Guiliani 120 would be perfect on a tele or good for any guitar. The Brouwer 12 should work there too. But once you get to the latter numbers of the Sor 24 you'll likely run out of room to do all the work necessary. I wouldn't try the Villa Lobos 12 at all (though a few Etudes, like #1 do go well on an electric)

As to classical  guitar helping with other kinds of playing. Well, yeah, it helps, just in the way playing different kinds of styles help expand your knowledge. Randi Rhodes was known to be a huge fan of the Villa Lobos 12 Etudes and used some of them as warm up pieces.

I will say though that there's a difference. As you can see, classical guitar is all about dissection and building ways in and out of positions. It's almost a scholarly pursuit. Whereas other styles, especially Jazz, are almost diametrically opposed (less dissection and more flowing). For these kinds I'd say look at what Glen was talking about shifting scales and all that. If you can do that you're better off than teaching yourself classical guitar to get better at Jazz guitar.

Classical guitar is about taking something someone else made, playing by their rules and making it your own. Jazz is about creating your own thing. Different paradigm. Requires different skills.
que

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #82 on: January 03, 2019, 01:37:07 PM »
Daily Status: 2019-01-02

- Completed Section #2 of Beginner Piano on Udemy, bringing me to 22% completion for the course.
- Learned how to find any key (A-G) on the piano using some brain tricks. I can name any key now! :)
- Practiced the right hand intro to "Auld Lang Syne" on Flowkey (beginner level.)

Tasty, I love your gusto here. But a possible word of caution, as you get better and move farther the progress you make will not be able to be measured daily. Or if you did it'll get really depressing. There's been times where I've spent a week working on 4 measures.  It can be really depressing. I used to report status weekly so I'd have more to show. I just wanted to point out not to get discouraged when you get to that point where you spend days on one thing. It doesn't mean you're stalled or crap. It's a different kind of progress.
que

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #83 on: January 03, 2019, 02:57:36 PM »
As for my daily status, I'll be using this as my sight reading practice today.



It's a nice piece, never played it.
que

Glen

  • Unban Cream
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #84 on: January 03, 2019, 03:46:51 PM »
Btw the middle section of Fur Elise is NOT beginner level. I was a year into lessons before I tackled that. There's a simplified version that cuts the middle section that Andy could probably learn this year though.

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #85 on: January 03, 2019, 04:53:27 PM »
Daily Status: 2019-01-02

- Completed Section #2 of Beginner Piano on Udemy, bringing me to 22% completion for the course.
- Learned how to find any key (A-G) on the piano using some brain tricks. I can name any key now! :)
- Practiced the right hand intro to "Auld Lang Syne" on Flowkey (beginner level.)

Tasty, I love your gusto here. But a possible word of caution, as you get better and move farther the progress you make will not be able to be measured daily. Or if you did it'll get really depressing. There's been times where I've spent a week working on 4 measures.  It can be really depressing. I used to report status weekly so I'd have more to show. I just wanted to point out not to get discouraged when you get to that point where you spend days on one thing. It doesn't mean you're stalled or crap. It's a different kind of progress.

Ya I know, in the OP I mentioned weekly updates for the year. I just feel like doing daily right now while I'm hyped up. :P

I am concerned about what'll happen when I hit my first wall (or couple walls.) It's been really smooth sailing so far but I'm basically covering the same ground a new third-grade student would. Sticking with it and practicing a section every day is tough, but much more so when you end the session no better than when you started. It concerns me how it'd probably only take a day or two of that to derail my interest slightly (which always has the danger of becoming more than that.) I suppose in that specific instance I could try a different section or song, but there's other "mental" walls I'm sure I'll hit once I get into intermediate music theory too. There's a number of things I'm expecting to potentially trip me up.

So it's something I have my eye on for sure. My hope with this thread is that the social pressure will keep me at the keyboard every day. :)

I also signed up for Habitica, an honestly pretty-lame habit tracking RPG thing. I've been using a pretty barebones tracker for the past two years to moderate success, but I wanted something cloud-based and more social. If anyone here is on the site, PM me and I'll add you ("Parties" and "Group Quests" are things on Habitica.)
« Last Edit: January 03, 2019, 04:58:00 PM by Tasty Meat »

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #86 on: January 04, 2019, 01:46:36 AM »
Daily Status: 2019-01-03

- Read 30 pages of Music Theory for Dummies. :o Just kept devouring the pages while bored this afternoon. About 1/3rd done with the book now.
- Memorized the first half of the right hand part to "Auld Lang Syne" (see spoiler.) Second half and left hand this weekend. Really happy with my progress today. :)

spoiler (click to show/hide)

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #87 on: January 05, 2019, 12:18:44 AM »
Tasty, is it cool to use your thread as a catch-all for musical thoughts? I'm a philosopher.
prick

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #88 on: January 05, 2019, 01:00:07 PM »
Tasty, is it cool to use your thread as a catch-all for musical thoughts? I'm a philosopher.

Absolutely!

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #89 on: January 05, 2019, 08:11:55 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_and_mathematics

My music theory book has touched on a lot of this so far and it's kind of blowing my mind.

Trent Dole

  • the sharpest tool in the shed
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #90 on: January 06, 2019, 01:14:11 AM »
I've seen it said that music theory is 'just numbers'. :-*
Hi

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #91 on: January 06, 2019, 06:59:29 PM »
I've been messing around with this looper pedal I bought a couple of weeks ago. Man, what a great tool for testing out musical ideas.
prick

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #92 on: January 06, 2019, 07:01:54 PM »
Made a deal with myself to upgrade from my 61-key non-weighted Casio to the 88-key *fully-weighted Yamaha P45/P71 at the end of the month... if I keep up with my practicing and meet the goals I set out at the start of the month.

Wish me luck. 😬
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 08:30:58 AM by Tasty Meat »

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #93 on: January 06, 2019, 07:18:29 PM »
good luck!
prick

Glen

  • Unban Cream
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #94 on: January 06, 2019, 08:04:27 PM »
Get fully weighted man.

Glen

  • Unban Cream
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #95 on: January 06, 2019, 08:05:26 PM »
I've been messing around with this looper pedal I bought a couple of weeks ago. Man, what a great tool for testing out musical ideas.

What pedal is it?

shosta

  • just a thought
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #96 on: January 06, 2019, 08:26:10 PM »
jagrabag, you should post some of your stuff

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #97 on: January 06, 2019, 08:42:06 PM »
I've been messing around with this looper pedal I bought a couple of weeks ago. Man, what a great tool for testing out musical ideas.

What pedal is it?

NUX LOOP CORE. It works ok, but doesn't seem to work with distortion. I am still figuring it our, probably need to check out some demo videos.
prick

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #98 on: January 06, 2019, 08:43:00 PM »
jagrabag, you should post some of your stuff

I don't have anything recorded nor do I have the equipment for that. This year I plan on getting that fixed.
prick

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #99 on: January 06, 2019, 08:44:31 PM »
Get fully weighted man.

That's more Demi's thing than mine

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #100 on: January 07, 2019, 12:31:08 AM »
👀

spoiler (click to show/hide)


I'm an emo boy shutup :maf :-[

spoiler (click to show/hide)
This is sooooooo much fun. I'm even having a lot of fun just trying to do sheet music without any other visual aides. I need to start using a metronome tho, my timing's pretty fucked up.

I'n not 10% satisfied with my current playing of this btw, and I still have the other half to learn too.

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #101 on: January 07, 2019, 01:46:58 AM »
Get fully weighted man.

Also I was incorrect -- the Yamaha P45/P71 is fully-weighted. :D

I'm gonna get the bundle, too (consists of the stand, bench, pedal, and headphones.)
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 01:51:38 AM by Tasty Meat »

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #102 on: January 10, 2019, 07:21:58 AM »
The Russians' contributions to musical arts are substantial and will not be questioned.

prick

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #103 on: January 10, 2019, 09:41:51 AM »
Rimsky Korsakov is seriously underrated. I always say the best neo-classical Spanish composer was Russian because of him.
que

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #104 on: January 10, 2019, 09:51:04 AM »
Rimsky Korsakov is seriously underrated. I always say the best neo-classical Spanish composer was Russian because of him.

the flight of the bumblebee is the only work of his I am familiar with (although I could have heard more of his stuff and just don't know the titles/that they were his compositions). Any particular works you like?
prick

recursivelyenumerable

  • you might think that; I couldn't possibly comment
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #105 on: January 10, 2019, 11:18:14 AM »
You've probably heard parts of Scheherezade ...
QED

agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #106 on: January 10, 2019, 11:23:08 AM »
oh yeah, for sure
prick

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
Re: Learning (or continuing to learn) an instrument in 2019
« Reply #107 on: January 10, 2019, 11:27:07 AM »




que

Tasty Meat

  • Senior Member
New thread title. :)

Philip Cardgage

  • Frank O'Conner's (Franchise Development Director of the once well reviewed Halo series) Life Coach
  • Senior Member
I've always wondered, is there a term for a rythmn or bassline that is more or less constant through a song, even though everything else changes for the chorus?

Examples being,

The bassline in Bodies



The rhythm in Everlong



agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
ostinato?
prick

Philip Cardgage

  • Frank O'Conner's (Franchise Development Director of the once well reviewed Halo series) Life Coach
  • Senior Member
ostinato?

Hmmm, that seems right going by this.

But he gives an example with Clocks, which I don't think has it throughout the whole song, non-stop, does that still apply?


agrajag

  • just a little
  • Senior Member
well, ostinato is a more general term for a repeating pattern, maybe there is a more specific term for what you're thinking of
prick

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
I've always wondered, is there a term for a rythmn or bassline that is more or less constant through a song, even though everything else changes for the chorus?

Examples being,

The bassline in Bodies



The rhythm in Everlong


Boy, am I going to blow your mind right now

que

Philip Cardgage

  • Frank O'Conner's (Franchise Development Director of the once well reviewed Halo series) Life Coach
  • Senior Member
I'm not listening to 13 minutes of organ music, trying to figure out what's supposed to blow my mind.

I'm a Puppy!

  • Knows the muffin man.
  • Senior Member
I'm not listening to 13 minutes of organ music, trying to figure out what's supposed to blow my mind.
Your loss. Stay dumb. :trumps
que

Philip Cardgage

  • Frank O'Conner's (Franchise Development Director of the once well reviewed Halo series) Life Coach
  • Senior Member
I'm not listening to 13 minutes of organ music, trying to figure out what's supposed to blow my mind.
Your loss. Stay dumb. :trumps

Ok.

spoiler (click to show/hide)
Dis you?


Stro

  • Senior Member
I'm not listening to 13 minutes of organ music, trying to figure out what's supposed to blow my mind.


The reeds


 :miyamoto

Philip Cardgage

  • Frank O'Conner's (Franchise Development Director of the once well reviewed Halo series) Life Coach
  • Senior Member
I can appreciate the organ as much as any god fearing man.

Stro

  • Senior Member
Appreciate this organ, toots


 :dice